Jason Barton

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Archive for the ‘New York Times’ tag

T. Boone Pickens Tweaks His Energy Plan

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January 20, 2010, 2:02 pm

By JIM MOTAVALLI

Pickens
Matt Nager for The New York Times
“We have to target heavy-duty vehicles,” Mr. Pickens said during a meeting at The New York Times.

From our friends at the Wheels blog:

T. Boone Pickens, the Texas billionaire, got his first car, a 1942 Ford, in 1946. But in an interview today at The New York Times, he made it plain that the national romance with the automobile was beyond his reckoning. “America is nuts about cars,” he said. “I don’t quite understand this thing about horsepower. Cars are not a big deal to me, but they are a big deal to a lot of people.”

Nevertheless, the Pickens plan he began in 2008 seeks to transform the way Americans drive by powering vehicles with what he calls our “abundance of clean, cheap, domestic natural gas.” But, in New York, Mr. Pickens said he was refocusing the plan, not only de-emphasizing wind energy, but also turning his natural gas focus from cars and pickup trucks to big commercial vehicles, including buses and the 18-wheelers that move American freight.

Read the entire article here.

Trucks, Trains, and Trees: Saving the Amazon

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By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: November 11, 2009

Tapajós National Forest, Brazil

No matter how many times you hear them, there are some statistics that just bowl you over. The one that always stuns me is this: Imagine if you took all the cars, trucks, planes, trains and ships in the world and added up their exhaust every year. The amount of carbon dioxide, or CO2, all those cars, trucks, planes, trains and ships collectively emit into the atmosphere is actually less than the carbon emissions every year that result from the chopping down and clearing of tropical forests in places like Brazil, Indonesia and the Congo. We are now losing a tropical forest the size of New York State every year, and the carbon that releases into the atmosphere now accounts for roughly 17 percent of all global emissions contributing to climate change.

It is going to be a long time before we transform the world’s transportation fleet so it is emission-free. But right now — like tomorrow — we could eliminate 17 percent of all global emissions if we could halt the cutting and burning of tropical forests. But to do that requires putting in place a whole new system of economic development — one that makes it more profitable for the poorer, forest-rich nations to preserve and manage their trees rather than to chop them down to make furniture or plant soybeans.

Without a new system for economic development in the timber-rich tropics, you can kiss the rainforests goodbye. The old model of economic growth will devour them. The only Amazon your grandchildren will ever relate to is the one that ends in dot-com and sells books.

Read the entire article here.

Written by Jason

November 11th, 2009 at 7:23 pm