Jason Barton

Professional Information and Energy News

Archive for the ‘International’ tag

Cooperation on Biofuels Increasing between Brazil and US

without comments

With the US ending both the tariff on imported ethanol and the tax credit for domestic blenders, cooperation between the US and Brazil on biofuel technology is increasing, as well as efforts to trade renewable fuels on global markets. (See my post at the end of last year)

Yes, we need to be ever vigilant on the possible effects of increased biofuel production on food availability and prices as well as on land use, soil and water quality, and related issues. In my doctoral dissertation, however, I examined these issues in depth and contend that increased production can occur along with protection of ecological health.

The cooperation discussed in the article below can lead to greater efficiency of renewable fuel production, using less land and less water to produce more fuel.

Energy is fundamental to economic growth, and as countries in Latin America and Africa increase their ability to produce renewable energy domestically, they create more jobs and better the lives of their people in ways that will improve economic as well as environmental conditions for generations. These are undoubtedly positive.

It is a fascinating time to be alive.

Insight: U.S. and Brazil – At last, friends on ethanol

A gas station worker fills a car's tank with ethanol in Rio de Janeiro April 30, 2008. Brazil is the world's largest producer and exporter of ethanol. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes

By Brian Winter

BRASILIA | Fri Sep 14, 2012 11:21pm IST

(Reuters) – After years at each other’s throats, Brazil and the United States are working together to promote the use of ethanol in a collaboration that could revolutionize global markets and the makeup of the biofuel itself.

The breakthrough came in January when Washington allowed a three-decade-old subsidy for U.S. ethanol producers to expire and ended a steep tariff on foreign biofuels. The tariff, in particular, had poisoned diplomatic relations between the world’s top two ethanol-producing countries for years.

Continue reading this article here.

World,China Oil Demand To Slow;Plenty Of Capacity-IEA

without comments

This is great news, unless it drives shortsightedness in investors and researchers who would otherwise drive innovation.

  • JULY 13, 2010, 4:54 A.M. ET

UPDATE:2011 World,China Oil Demand To Slow;Plenty Of Capacity-IEA

 
   By Spencer Swartz 
   Of DOW JONES NEWSWIRES

LONDON–The International Energy Agency said Tuesday it expects oil demand to slow next year in China and most other parts of the world, indicating that crude prices are likely to trade at subdued levels well into next year.

In its first assessment of 2011 global oil trends, the Paris-based agency forecast world oil demand to grow by 1.3 million barrels a day, or 1.6%. That increase rate is below the 2.1% rise in global crude consumption expected this year, although it is in line with 1.7% growth seen on average annually from 2000 to 2007.

Despite a higher rate of global economic growth projected next year, the IEA said the dual impact of improving energy efficiency in industrialized nations and a gradual phasing out of economic stimulus in emerging markets like China–the fastest-growing oil consumer globally–would slow the pace of oil consumption.

[…]

“Whisper it quietly, but we might, just might, be in for some market stability for a while longer,” the IEA said.

[…]

Consumers are still bent on maximizing energy efficiency in places like the U.S. and oil traders have lingering doubts about the health of Europe’s and America’s economic recovery and the knock-on effect in emerging markets.

[…]

There are some potential problems ahead. Non-OPEC oil supply is forecast to grow by just 400,000 barrels a day in 2011, half the growth rate expected this year and far below recent historical averages, due to aging oil fields.

Read the entire article here.

Energy ministers: $25 trillion investment by 2030 to meet rising demand

without comments

It’s important to note that this is not investment in clean or alternative energy research, only the investment needed to meet rising demand.

(AP) – 2 days ago

CANCUN, Mexico — Energy ministers gathered at an international forum Wednesday estimated the world will have to invest $25 trillion over the next two decades to satisfy energy demand.

“The projected global investment needs to amount to over $25 trillion up to 2030, a huge challenge in a time of unprecedented uncertainty and volatility,” according to a statement from the 12th International Energy Forum being held in the Caribbean coastal resort of Cancun.

Read the entire article here.

Written by Jason

April 4th, 2010 at 1:35 pm

U.S. Expects Steady Climb in Energy Prices

without comments

Good news and bad news, though the EIA has been wrong before. I’m still listening to friends and colleagues predicting a double-dip recession, so am not completely convinced that the domestic economy is beginning an unabated rise out of its current lows. I do have a bit more confidence in the global economy, though, so these growth projections make sense. Of course, I’ve been wrong before, too.

It’s a fascinating time to be alive.

JANUARY 13, 2010

By BRIAN BASKIN

NEW YORK—Energy prices are undergoing a long, slow march higher as major economies shake off the effects of last year’s recession, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said Tuesday in its monthly outlook.

The agency expects global gross-domestic-product growth to increase from 2.5% in 2010 to 3.7% next year, enough to prevent oil and natural-gas prices from heading back toward the multiyear lows hit in 2009. At the same time, the gradual nature of the recovery and ample inventories built up during the downturn should prevent a repeat of the spike in energy prices during 2008.

February crude futures settled down 2.1% at $80.79 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange, after hitting a 15-month high above $83 a barrel last week. February gas on Tuesday was at $5.569 a million British thermal units.

“What they’re projecting this far forward is really more or less a return to normalcy,” said Tim Evans, an analyst with Citi Futures Perspective in New York.

Read the entire article here.

Written by Jason

January 13th, 2010 at 9:42 am

GE Chief Hopes Copenhagen Leads to US Clean Energy

without comments

Here’s another great example of leaders in industry not being afraid of an economy based on cleaner energy, but embracing it.

GE chief Jeffery Immelt hopes Copenhagen climate conference leads to US clean energy policy

GREENVILLE, S.C. December 8, 2009 (AP)

General Electric CEO Jeffrey Immelt said Tuesday he hopes the Copenhagen conference on climate change leads the United States to develop a green energy policy to grow the economy.

“What’s most important for the U.S. is that we go from Copenhagen, go into 2010, and have the courage to act on clean energy for the good of the country from the standpoint of creating jobs,” Immelt told a conference on renewable energy.

More than 100 national leaders from around the world are meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark, to try to craft an agreement to reduce greenhouse gases and stem climate change.

Immelt told a meeting on renewable energy at Clemson University that within five years, 10 million new green jobs will be created worldwide.

Read the entire article here.

What’s Necessary To Compete For Clean Energy Jobs

without comments

To say the least, I am nervous about the amount of spending happening in Washington under the Obama administration. It seems so simple to most of us on the outside: If the investments in energy, healthcare, or anything else, can be shown to repay themselves in the near future with savings, if the efficiency of the systems can be improved so as to reduce waste and make the systems more effective, then the investments are wise. There are also other options to government spending, as we have seen the willingness of private investors and even some of the major oil firms to put money into advancing emerging energy technologies. I would love to leave behind as many energy options to my grandchildren as possible. I would not like to leave them an exorbitant federal deficit. Are these mutually exclusive?

NationalJournal.com

December 7, 2009

By Rep. Ed Markey, D-Mass.

Chairman, House Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming

The winds of change blow into Copenhagen this week, as the United States and 200 other nations will meet for the UN Climate Conference. Copenhagen will indicate which nations are serious about energy security, ending oil addiction, cutting carbon pollution and creating clean energy jobs.

This week, I am pleased to host this discussion on the NationalJournal.com Copenhagen Insider blog, as I believe Copenhagen will reset both the international and domestic debate for the next year. To get started, here are two key areas to watch:

New U.S. Leadership

President Obama arrives in Copenhagen next week, with a refreshing new message for the world:  The United States is ready to be the leader, not the laggard, in the clean energy economy. He will back up this proclamation by proposing a carbon pollution reduction target in the range of 17 percent by 2020 and investment proposals to create clean energy jobs and technology at home that can be spread to other nations to help cut global warming pollution.

Read the entire article here.