Jason Barton

Professional Information and Energy News

BP Chief Says Brazilian Ethanol is Best Bet to Replace Petroleum

with one comment

There is definitely substantial agricultural land for much more fuel, fiber, and food production in Brazil, as well as preservation of forests and even reforestation, but the headline seems quite an overstatement of the facts.

My PhD research has investigated the potential for Brazil to supply enough ethanol for the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standards, which may have renewables accounting for as much as 20% of our transportation fuels in 2022. There does appear to be sufficient arable land for both Brazilian demand as well as to supply the U.S. for these renewable mandates signed into law by George Bush in 2007.

To say there is enough land to replace all petroleum globally, however, especially considering the booming demand in China and India as their economies expand and have more people driving cars, is a stretch, to say the least.

Between the typos, the outdated photo, and the lack of background research for the article below, I’m wondering where to send my resume for a job at the Telegraph.

Brazilian ethanol is the best hope for replacing oil, says BP’s Bob Dudley

Ethanol derived from Brazilian sugar-cane offers the best hope of replacing oil as the world’s main source of fuel when it runs out, according to Bob Dudley, BP’s chief executive.

Brazilian ethanol is the best hope for replacing oil, says BP's Bob Dudley

By Robin Yapp, in Sao Paulo 7:03PM GMT 13 Feb 2011

He said Brazilian ethanol is the “best type of renewable energy” and offers the possibility of an “ultrapotent fuel that could revolutionise the market”.

“The alcohol extracted from sugar cane is cheaper, less polluting and more efficient than that from corn, for example, produced in the US.

BP is channelling its research into renewable fuels accordingly, with 40pc of its $1bn (£625m) annual spend in this area targeted at Brazilian ethanol, Mr Dudley told the weekly Brazilian news magazine Veja.

“There will obviously a time when the oil runs out and with this prospect on the horizon, we will use more renewable energy sources,” he said.

Read the entire article here.

Written by Jason

February 17th, 2011 at 9:55 pm