Jason Barton

Professional Information and Energy News

Real People Show the Need to Internalize the Externalities

without comments

If the devastation of the Gulf oil spill is too abstract, as it is for many of us, this story places faces and immediacy on the tragedy. The women discussed here have already lost their husbands and are now in danger of further losing their ability to make ends meet, as soon as the end of this month, this of all months. Yet executives and policy makers bicker over who’s responsible.

If BP and the other companies that operated the well were not fully prepared to pay the costs, then they should not have ventured after the benefits.

To put it unemotionally, the pain these women are experiencing is an externality. The job of government is not to distort the market, letting these firms profit at the expense of third parties, but to ensure that these companies are free to pursue their profits while ensuring that they must pay the costs, internal and external, direct and indirect, associated with their business.

Ah, it’s so simple, no?

  • DECEMBER 16, 2010, 12:08 P.M. ET

Widows Push Congress to Act on Gulf-Spill Measure

By DIONNE SEARCEY

Two widows of men killed in the Gulf of Mexico explosion that led to the largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history say they fear Congress is losing interest in passing a measure soon that would allow them to seek damages in court for the tragedy.

Under current law, families of anyone killed at sea—rather than on land—are banned from receiving damages for loss of care and comfort. Congress is considering a measure that would change the law for families of workers who died in the BP PLC explosion.

Read the entire article here.

Written by Jason

December 16th, 2010 at 11:54 pm